Book of Mormon/Warfare/Oaths taken by warriors

Table of Contents

Warfare in the Book of Mormon: Oaths taken by warriors

Jump to Subtopic:


Terrence L. Szink: "An oath of allegiance is administered...The well-known title­ of-liberty episode in Alma 46 of the Book of Mormon includes an interesting example of just such an oath"

Terrence L. Szink,

An important element in any military endeavor is the loyalty of the soldiers. Obviously, even the most brilliant military tactics will fail if the troops are unfaithful in fulfilling their duty. Often, to instill this loyalty, an oath of allegiance is administered to recruits. The well-known title­ of-liberty episode in Alma 46 of the Book of Mormon includes an interesting example of just such an oath. This paper will examine that oath, drawing upon parallels from the ancient Near East for comparison.—(Click here to continue) [1]


Mark J. Morrise: "The simile curse is a type of curse that appears in ancient Near Eastern, Old Testament, and Book of Mormon texts"

Mark J. Morrise,

The simile curse is a type of curse that appears in ancient Near Eastern, Old Testament, and Book of Mormon texts. It consists of two parts: (1) an event (e.g., "Just as this wax is burned by fire") and (2) an application of that event to the subject of the curse (e.g., "so shall Arpad be burned"). In ancient Near Eastern texts, simile curses appear in written treaties and were often part of a ritual acted out during a treaty ceremony. In the Old Testament, simile curses appear primarily in prophetic writings as literary devices. In the Book of Mormon, simile curses appear in the context of treaties, religious covenants, and prophecies, and in several instances were acted out. These curses were probably part of the oral tradition of ancient Near Eastern, Old Testament, and Book of Mormon peoples. —(Click here to continue) [2]


John W. Welch: "people of Ammon...the grant of this exceptional privilege was consistent with ancient Israelite law"

John W. Welch,

The only Book of Mormon group given an exemption from military service was the famous people of Ammon. In repenting of their previous shedding of blood, they had sworn an oath that they would never again take up arms (see Alma 24:11-13). After they arrived in Zarahemla, they were granted an extraordinary exemption from active military duty if they would help to sustain the Nephite armies with provisions (see Alma 27:23-24). Surprisingly, the grant of this exceptional privilege was consistent with ancient Israelite law. —(Click here to continue) [3]


Stephen D. Ricks: "every conflict...was considered to be prosecuted under the divine direction of the gods or of God"

Stephen D. Ricks,

In a sense, every conflict in the ancient Near East—as reflected in Egyptian, Babylonian, Assyrian, Hittite, Persian, and Syro-Palestinian texts—was considered to be prosecuted under the divine direction of the gods or of God. War was begun at the command of, or with the approval and aid of, the gods or God. It was generally accompanied by sacrifices, fought by men who were in a state of ritual readiness for conflict, and ended by the victors with thanksgiving and offerings to deity. —(Click here to continue) [4]


Donald W. Parry: "This prophetic symbolic action by Isaiah represented a prophetic curse that destruction and ruin would come upon the Egyptians"

At one point in his ministry, Isaiah was instructed by the Lord to remove his garment and shoes and walk "naked [like a slave, without an upper garment] and barefoot" among the people. Isaiah's action was to be a sign, for as Isaiah walked like a slave, even so would the Egyptians become slaves to the Assyrians (Isaiah 20:2-4). This prophetic symbolic action by Isaiah represented a prophetic curse that destruction and ruin would come upon the Egyptians. —(Click here to continue) [5]

Notes

  1. Terrence L. Szink, "An Oath of Allegiance in the Book of Mormon," Warfare in the Book of Mormon (1990)
  2. Mark J. Morrise, "Simile Curses in the Ancient Near East, Old Testament, and Book of Mormon," Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 2:1 (1993)
  3. John W. Welch, "Exemption from Military Duty," Reexploring the Book of Mormon (1992)
  4. Stephen D. Ricks, "'Holy War' in the Book of Mormon and the Ancient Near East," Reexploring the Book of Mormon (1992)
  5. Donald W. Parry, "Symbolic Action as Prophetic Curse," Reexploring the Book of Mormon (1992)