Criticism of Mormonism/Books/Blood of the Prophets: Brigham Young and the Massacre at Mountain Meadows/Use of sources

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Selected analysis of sources used in Blood of the Prophets

A FairMormon Analysis of: Blood of the Prophets: Brigham Young and the Massacre at Mountain Meadows, a work by author: Will Bagley

Selected analysis of sources used in Blood of the Prophets by Will Bagley

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Response to claim: 51-52 - Brigham Young and others taught blood atonement for the "unpardonable sin"

The author(s) of Blood of the Prophets make(s) the following claim:

The author claims that Brigham Young and others taught blood atonement for the "unpardonable sin," which set the stage for the Mountain Meadows Massacre.

FairMormon Response

Fact checking results: The author has stated erroneous information or misinterpreted their sources

Even if this was a doctrine that was implemented (of which there is scant evidence), the Fancher party cannot have been subject to it, since none were Mormons whose "calling and election" had been "made sure."


Response to claim: 58, 63 - The supposedly violent society in Utah

The author(s) of Blood of the Prophets make(s) the following claim:

Critics are inconsistent in their treatment of the supposedly violent society in Utah when compared to the massacred immigrants.

FairMormon Response

Response to claim: 77 - The author credits the story of Judge William W. Drummond of the Mormons' complicity in the death of Judge Leonidas Shaver, John Gunnison, and Almon Babbitt

The author(s) of Blood of the Prophets make(s) the following claim:

Author credits the story of Judge William W. Drummond of the Mormons' complicity in the death of Judge Leonidas Shaver, John Gunnison, and Almon Babbitt.

FairMormon Response

Response to claim: 98 - Critics who wish to exploit the Mountain Meadows Massacre to attack the Church frequently cite an anonymous source signed "Argus"

The author(s) of Blood of the Prophets make(s) the following claim:

Critics are often less than selective in their use of historical sources. Critics who wish to exploit the Mountain Meadows Massacre to attack the Church frequently cite an anonymous source signed "Argus."

FairMormon Response

Response to claim: 114 - Dimmick Huntington's journal discusses Indians raising "allies" to help in the massacre

The author(s) of Blood of the Prophets make(s) the following claim:

The author claims that Dimmick Huntington's journal discusses Indians raising "allies" to help in the massacre at Mountain Meadows which he claims Brigham is orchestrating.

FairMormon Response

Fact checking results: This claim is false

Huntington's journal entry for 1 September 1857 actually says they were "afraid to fight the Americans & so would raise grain.

Response to claim: 117 - The author draws on dreams, anonymous sources, family traditions, folklore and other such speculative or dubious evidence to condemn the Church

The author(s) of Blood of the Prophets make(s) the following claim:

The author draws on dreams, anonymous sources, family traditions, folklore and other such speculative or dubious evidence to condemn the Church or its members in the matter of the Mountain Meadows Massacre.

FairMormon Response


Response to claim: 151, 304–305 - Jacob Hamblin's son Albert raped two women at the Mountain Meadows Massacre

The author(s) of Blood of the Prophets make(s) the following claim:

It is claimed that Jacob Hamblin's son Albert raped two women at the Mountain Meadows Massacre, and Jacob was later to blame these on John D. Lee.

FairMormon Response

Response to claim: 196 - A gift of salt given to Johnston's army by Brigham which he is presumed to have implied was poisoned

The author(s) of Blood of the Prophets make(s) the following claim:

Critics mention a gift of salt given to Johnston's army by Brigham which he is presumed to have implied was poisoned.

FairMormon Response

Fact checking results: The author has stated erroneous information or misinterpreted their sources

Brigham did not try to poison the army, and his behavior was not suspicious enough to keep the troops from using the gift.