Criticism of Mormonism/Online documents/For my Wife and Children (Letter to my Wife)/Chapter 24

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Response to "For my Wife and Children" ("Letter to my Wife"): Chapter 24 - Church Spending

A FairMormon Analysis of: For my Wife and Children (Letter to my Wife), a work by author: Anonymous
Chart LTMW church spending.png

Response to claims made in "For my Wife and Children" ("Letter to my Wife"): Chapter 24 - Church Spending

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Response to claim: "while we know that a portion is used for the operational expenses of the Church, much of the donations make their way into business investments"

The author(s) of "For my Wife and Children" ("Letter to my Wife") make(s) the following claim:

while we know that a portion is used for the operational expenses of the Church, much of the donations make their way into business investments. According to a 2012 investigative report by the Reuters news agency, the Church receives about $7 billion in tithing revenue each year and several billion from its for-profit business ventures.

Author's sources:
  1. Peter Henderson, "Insight: Mormon church made wealthy by donations," Reuters (12 Aug. 2012).

FairMormon Response

Fact checking results: This claim contains propaganda - The author, or the author's source, is providing information or ideas in a slanted way in order to instill a particular attitude or response in the reader

There is absolutely no data to support the claim made by the author that "much of the donations make their way into business investments." The author cites a news article by Reuters, "Insight: Mormon church made wealthy by donations," (12 Aug. 2012). According to the article:

Relying heavily on church records in countries that require far more disclosure than the United States, Cragun and Reuters estimate that the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints brings in some $7 billion annually in tithes and other donations. ... Church spokesman Michael Purdy declined to comment specifically on the estimates but said that the church was different from a corporation. “Other projections are speculative and do not reflect an understanding of how the church uses its income to bless the lives of people,” he added, saying the church was financed primarily from member tithing and offerings.

[1]

The article makes no comment and draws no conclusions regarding donations from members being routed to business investments, and only quotes the speculative comment of one ex-Mormon regarding donation slips: "Hey, where’s the slot of ’shopping malls’?”.

Logical Fallacy: Begging the Question—The author presents a circular argument in which the starting assumption requires the conclusion to be true.

The author assumes, without any evidence whatsoever, that the Church must be funneling tithing funds into its "for profit" businesses simply because the Church has many "for profit" businesses.

Response to claim: "The lack of financial transparency by the LDS Church has put revenue estimates between $10-20 billion annually"

The author(s) of "For my Wife and Children" ("Letter to my Wife") make(s) the following claim:

The lack of financial transparency by the LDS Church has put revenue estimates between $10-20 billion annually.

Author's sources:
  1. Peter Henderson, "Insight: Mormon church made wealthy by donations," Reuters (12 Aug. 2012).

FairMormon Response

Fact checking results: This claim contains propaganda - The author, or the author's source, is providing information or ideas in a slanted way in order to instill a particular attitude or response in the reader

This information is not from the article that the author uses as his source, nor does the sentence even make any sense. How does "lack of financial transparency" allow one to make a revenue estimate of "$10-20 billion annually?"


Response to claim: "What are the Church’s for-profit business ventures?"

The author(s) of "For my Wife and Children" ("Letter to my Wife") make(s) the following claim:

What are the Church’s for-profit business ventures? For a start, they own the largest cattle ranch in the United States, with other large industrial ranches and farms in Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, Australia and Great Britain. The Church also owns a small media empire, an investment fund, the City Creek Center, investment properties, and more. ... The list of the LDS Church’s for-profit businesses and investments is long. In addition to multiple real estate firms and extensive land holdings, the Church owns banking institutions, insurance companies, financial advising firms, newspapers, radio stations, cable channels, and many more.

Author's sources:
  1. City Creek Reserve Inc (CCRI) 2009 tax return. (http://irs990.charityblossom.org/990T/ 200912/208152281.pdf
  2. “LDS Church to Develop 32-story Building in Downtown Philadelphia," KSL NBC 5 Utah News, 2/16/2014.
  3. “Center City Philadelphia 2014-2018 Developments," https://issuu.com/ccdphila/docs/ccdevelopments2015/28
  4. “111 Main Street Tower Has New Developer," Deseret News, 2/27/2014
  5. “Mormon Church Completes Huge Buy of Land, Now Owns 2 Percent of Florida," Orlando Sentinel, 3/6/2014
  6. “Mormon Church Moves to Build a City in Florida," Salt Lake Tribune, 7/10/2015
  7. “West Virginia Getting Legacy Complex," Deseret News, 9/14/1999
  8. “Riverton sees Mormon Church Daybreak-like project as ‘crown jewel'," Salt Lake Tribune, 2/17/2016
  9. “Tending the Flock," Deseret News, 7/8/2000
  10. “Mormon church real estate firm plans to bring thousands of new homes to Riverton," Salt Lake Tribune, 12/4/2015

FairMormon Response

Fact checking results: This claim is based upon correct information - The author is providing knowledge concerning some particular fact, subject, or event

Correct. The Church owns a number of "for profit" business ventures. These organizations pay taxes. They are not supported by tithing.


Response to claim: "Even though City Creek clearly generates substantial income, the Church has reclassified it as a 501(C)3:Charitable Organization...to avoid paying taxes on property income it collects"

The author(s) of "For my Wife and Children" ("Letter to my Wife") make(s) the following claim:

While meeting houses and temples occupy the religious, non-profit, tax exempt division of the Church, the City Creek Reserve Inc (CCRI) is a for-profit business. Even though City Creek clearly generates substantial income, the Church has reclassified it as a 501(C)3:Charitable Organization. Is it fair to classify the City Creek as a charity organization to avoid paying taxes on property income it collects from residential, office space, and retail store leases (such as Nordstrom, Apple, Macy’s & Tiffany’s&Co)? See the City Creek Reserve Inc (CCRI) 2009 tax return here. (http://irs990.charityblossom .org/990T/ 200912/208152281.pdf )

FairMormon Response

Fact checking results: This claim is false

The author mixes up "City Creek Center" (the mall, which is a for-profit entity which generates income and pays taxes) with "City Creek Reserve, Inc.", the 501(c)(3) property development company owned by the Church which provided the Church's monetary contribution to the construction of the mall. The IRS Form 990-T which the author provides as evidence that the Church "reclassified it as a 501(c)(3) charitable organization" is actually the form that an existing charitable organization uses to report taxes to be paid on its "unrelated business income." In other words, the form is filed to make sure that a 501(c)(3) organization pays proper taxes on any business income that it generates that is unrelated to its tax exempt charitable purpose.
  • City Creek Reserve, Inc. is a tax-exempt, non-profit corporation.
  • City Creek Reserve, Inc. receives income from a non-tax-exempt source, and therefore pays taxes on it, which is reported on IRS Form 990-T.
  • City Creek Reserve, Inc. may also receive income from tax exempt sources, but IRS Form 990-T doesn't tell us anything about that.

IRS Form 990-T has nothing whatsoever to do with converting an organization to 501(c)(3) status. The IRS Forms 990-T for City Creek Reserve, Inc. for the years 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2015 may be viewed here: City Creek Reserve, Inc 990s.


Response to claim: "Every year billions of tithing dollars are funneled into these businesses for non-religious and non-humanitarian aid purposes"

The author(s) of "For my Wife and Children" ("Letter to my Wife") make(s) the following claim:

The Church also owns a small media empire, an investment fund, the City Creek Center, investment properties, and more. ...Downtown Philadelphia, 1601 Vine St....111 Main Street Tower ... Florida Land ...Mormon Church Moves to Build a City in Florida...West Virginia Getting Legacy Complex...Riverton sees Mormon Church Daybreak-like project as ‘crown jewel... a private hunting preserve...Mormon church real estate firm plans to bring thousands of new homes to Riverton...Every year billions of tithing dollars are funneled into these businesses for non-religious and non-humanitarian aid purposes

FairMormon Response

Fact checking results: This claim contains propaganda - The author, or the author's source, is providing information or ideas in a slanted way in order to instill a particular attitude or response in the reader

The author provides a list of for-profit business ventures that the Church owns or controls, and jumps to the conclusion that "Every year billions of tithing dollars are funneled into these businesses for non-religious and non-humanitarian aid purposes." The Church, however, states that all of its business ventures are funded using profits from businesses that it owns, and that none of this comes from tithing funds. The author even includes the following quote from the Orlando Sentinal regarding the "Florida Land" transaction, which clearly identifies the Church entity, "AgReserves Inc." as a "taxpaying company":

AgReserves Inc., a taxpaying company of the church, said when the deal was first made public that it will continue to use the North Florida land for timber and agriculture. [2]


Response to claim: "the modern Church never passes an opportunity to remind us that all members, no matter how financially burdened, must pay them first. Yet...tithing funds are routed into multi-billion dollar investments"

The author(s) of "For my Wife and Children" ("Letter to my Wife") make(s) the following claim:

Should a single mother, who is struggling to feed her family, continue to be coerced into giving 10% of her small income to the Church? Not according to Joseph Smith and the early prophets. Under the threat of the loss of eternal salvation with our families, the modern Church never passes an opportunity to remind us that all members, no matter how financially burdened, must pay them first. Yet they seem to forget to mention that, in addition to covering the operational expenses of the Church, tithing funds are routed into multi-billion dollar investments?

FairMormon Response

Fact checking results: This claim contains propaganda - The author, or the author's source, is providing information or ideas in a slanted way in order to instill a particular attitude or response in the reader

The Church does not route tithing funds into "multi-billion dollar investments." The author also neglects to mention that the "single mother, who is struggling to feed her family" will not go hungry if she pays her tithing: The Church welfare program and fast offerings will help her to feed her family.

Jump to Detail:

Question: Should we pay tithing before paying for food or rent?

The Quote: "If paying tithing means that you can’t pay for water or electricity, pay tithing"

One critic of the Church states,

I find the following quote in the December 2012 Ensign very disturbing:

If paying tithing means that you can’t pay for water or electricity, pay tithing. If paying tithing means that you can’t pay your rent, pay tithing. Even if paying tithing means that you don’t have enough money to feed your family, pay tithing. The Lord will not abandon you.

Would a loving, kind, empathic God really place parents in the horrible position of having to choose whether to feed their children or pay what little they have to a multi-billion megamall owning Church that receives an estimated $8,000,000,000 in annual tithing receipts?" [3]

The quote used is part of a story about a family in San Salvador that had joined the Church and was experiencing a great change in their lives. We will provide a bit more of the context:

The Vigils’ bishop, César Orellana, also saw changes in their lives. Soon after their baptism, Amado approached Bishop Orellana and said, “We want to pay tithing, but we don’t know how.”

Bishop Orellana explained that tithing was 10 percent of their increase. Amado was somewhat concerned. At the time, Evelyn had a job, but he did not. “We always come up short,” Amado explained to his bishop, “but we want to pay tithing.”

Bishop Orellana responded, “Brother, the Lord has made many promises.” Together they read scriptures about the blessings that come from faithfully paying tithing, including the Lord’s words through the prophet Malachi: “Bring ye all the tithes into the storehouse, … and prove me now herewith, saith the Lord of hosts, if I will not open you the windows of heaven, and pour you out a blessing, that there shall not be room enough to receive it” (Malachi 3:10).

After reading these scriptures together, Bishop Orellana looked at the new convert and said, “If paying tithing means that you can’t pay for water or electricity, pay tithing. If paying tithing means that you can’t pay your rent, pay tithing. Even if paying tithing means that you don’t have enough money to feed your family, pay tithing. The Lord will not abandon you.”

The next Sunday, Amado approached Bishop Orellana again. This time he didn’t ask any questions. He simply handed his bishop an envelope and said, “Bishop, here is our tithing.”

Reflecting on this experience, Bishop Orellana says, “Ever since then, they have been faithful tithe payers.” The family received some commodities from the bishops’ storehouse during their financial difficulties. Beyond that, the Lord blessed them to be able to care for themselves. Evelyn received a promotion, and Amado found a good job. Evelyn later lost her job, but they continued to pay tithing and to receive spiritual and temporal blessings for their faithfulness. Once Bishop Orellana asked Amado how the family was doing financially. Amado responded, “We’re doing all right. Sometimes we don’t have much to eat, but we have enough. And more than anything, we trust in the Lord.” [4]

Choosing between tithing and food or rent

If someone is in the situation where they have to choose between tithing and food, it is of benefit to sit down and talk with the bishop as they have access to better training and employment opportunities as well as may be helpful in establishing a better budget so that such a conflict won't arise in the future.

With regard to self sufficiency, we are taught as well that we need to be part of our faith community and that requires of us time to allow others to serve us. It is a kindness to give others such opportunities, even when we don't necessarily need such help. There are blessings that come from being a charitable receiver as well as a charitable giver.


Question: Why should the poor and destitute pay tithing?

Biblical precedent for the idea that even those that are destitute will be blessed by the Lord if they pay their tithing

Critics of the Church often portray it as a business or corporation, with tithing being the method by which income is generated. If this were true, however, why would the Church be interested in the "widow's mite?" Critics often act as if the Church simply takes money from the poor and leaves them to fend for themselves. The reality is that the Church will not only support the destitute, but it will assist them in finding employment or means to create better circumstances in their lives. The Church does not force anyone to choose to pay tithing or to feed their children. The choice presented by the critics is a caricature which completely ignores the function of the Church Welfare program.

Paying tithing is a matter of faith. From a believer's perspective, a more accurate description than "pay what little they have to a multi-billion megamall owning Church" would be to "donate one-tenth of what little they have to the Lord."

There is a Biblical precedent for the idea that even those that are destitute will be blessed by the Lord if they pay their tithing. [5]:

The Lord says to Elijah, “Arise, get thee to Zarephath … : behold, I have commanded a widow woman there to sustain thee” (1 Kgs. 17:9). It is interesting that Elijah is not told to go to Zarephath until the widow and her son are at the point of death. It is at this extreme moment—facing starvation—that her faith will be tested.

As he comes into the city he sees her gathering sticks.

“And he called to her, and said, Fetch me, I pray thee, a little water in a vessel, that I may drink.

“And as she was going to fetch it, he called to her, and said, Bring me, I pray thee, a morsel of bread in thine hand.

“And she said, As the Lord thy God liveth, I have not a cake, but an handful of meal in a barrel, and a little oil in a cruse: and, behold, I am gathering two sticks, that I may go in and dress it for me and my son, that we may eat it, and die” (1 Kgs. 17:10–12).

A handful of meal would be very little indeed, perhaps just enough for one serving, which makes Elijah’s response intriguing. Listen: “And Elijah said unto her, Fear not; go and do as thou hast said: but make me thereof a little cake first” (1 Kgs. 17:13; emphasis added).

Now doesn’t that sound selfish, asking not just for the first piece, but possibly the only piece? Didn't our parents teach us to let other people go first and especially for a gentleman to let a lady go first, let alone a starving widow? Her choice—does she eat, or does she sacrifice her last meal and hasten death? Perhaps she will sacrifice her own food, but could she sacrifice the food meant for her starving son?

Elijah understood the doctrine that blessings come after the trial of our faith (see Ether 12:6; D&C 132:5). He wasn't being selfish. As the Lord’s servant, Elijah was there to give, not to take. Continuing from the narrative:

“But make me thereof a little cake first [the firstlings], and bring it unto me, and after make for thee and for thy son.

“For thus saith the Lord God of Israel, The barrel of meal shall not waste, neither shall the cruse of oil fail, until the day that the Lord sendeth rain upon the earth.

“And she went and did according to the saying of Elijah: and she, and he, and her house, did eat many days.

“And the barrel of meal wasted not, neither did the cruse of oil fail, according to the word of the Lord, which he spake by Elijah” (1 Kgs. 17:13–16; emphasis added).

Mark 12:41–44 gives us the story of the widows mite:

And Jesus sat over against the treasury, and beheld how the people cast money into the treasury: and many that were rich cast in much.
And there came a certain poor widow, and she threw in two mites, which make a farthing.
And he called unto him his disciples, and saith unto them, Verily I say unto you, That this poor widow hath cast more in, than all they which have cast into the treasury:
For all they did cast in of their abundance; but she of her want did cast in all that she had, even all her living.


Response to claim: "Family Promise"...relief organizations help the needy and homeless in the backyard of the LDS church headquarters and should never have to turn away parents and children because their finances are 'put to the test'"

The author(s) of "For my Wife and Children" ("Letter to my Wife") make(s) the following claim:

Family Promise “The need for our services continues to grow as more and more families in our community experience homelessness. Daily, our staff has to turn away parents and children who will end up sleeping in cars, tents, or unsafe conditions because we have no space for them. Without our dedicated network of congregations, Family Promise could not serve the families we do.” ... relief organizations help the needy and homeless in the backyard of the LDS church headquarters and should never have to turn away parents and children because their finances are “put to the test.”

FairMormon Response

Fact checking results: This claim is false

The Church is involved with and helps sponsor "Family Promise", as noted on their website (http://archive.familypromise.org/article/family-promise-gathers-salt-lake-city-its-11th-national-conference):

Family Promise Gathers in Salt Lake City for its 11th National Conference
Family Promise representatives and supporters, more than 260 in all, convened from September 23-25, 2011 in Salt Lake City for their national conference, Moving Mountains. The theme reflected the challenges faced by families and Affiliates alike in the current economy, as well as the amazing work being done by 171 Affiliates across the country each day. The conference was made possible, in part, by the generous sponsorships of American Express, MassMutual, Dinsmore Steele, Recycled Rides, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, and Brian Jaffe Associates.


Response to claim: "The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints was only 1 of 31 corporations that contributed to the Fourth Street Clinic’s private donations"

The author(s) of "For my Wife and Children" ("Letter to my Wife") make(s) the following claim:

Fourth Street Clinic 2011 donations = $7 million. Of that only 18% ($126,000) were from private donations. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints was only 1 of 31 corporations that contributed to the Fourth Street Clinic’s private donations.

FairMormon Response

Fact checking results: This claim contains propaganda - The author, or the author's source, is providing information or ideas in a slanted way in order to instill a particular attitude or response in the reader

The author has placed a lot of spin on this odd claim:
  1. The author criticizes the Church because they are "only 1 of 31 corporations" that contribute to support the Fourth Street Clinic. How can the Church be more than "one" of the organizations that donate? (And even on this point the author appears to be in error, since there are two different sponsors affiliated with "The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints".)
  2. The author fails to note that the Fourth Street Clinic has different levels of sponsorship, and that the Church participates at the highest level, which is "Life Saving Sponsors $50,000+", meaning that they donate at least $50,000. The following sponsorship levels are listed (http://fourthstreetclinic.org/major-program-sponsors/):
  • Life Saving Sponsors $50,000+ (Includes "The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Humanitarian Services")
  • Healing Sponsors $25,000+
  • Wellness Sponsors $10,000+ (Includes "The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Foundation")
  • Caring Sponsors $5,000+

In other words, the inclusion of the Fourth Street Clinic as support for the author's claim that the Church does not support local organizations that operate homeless shelters is counterintutive and makes no sense at all. If anything, it contradicts his claim.

Fourth street clinic donors.png

Response to claim: "'The Road Home partners with a variety of organizations to ensure families and individuals have the tools they need to get back on their feet.' The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints is not on that list"

The author(s) of "For my Wife and Children" ("Letter to my Wife") make(s) the following claim:

The Road Home. “The Road Home partners with a variety of organizations to ensure families and individuals have the tools they need to get back on their feet.” The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints is not on that list.

FairMormon Response

Fact checking results: This claim is false

Actually, they are on the list as a donor for 2016 (the same year that the author dates his letter). The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is one of the sponsors for "The Road Home" at the highest contribution level of $20,000+ (https://www.theroadhome.org/about/annual-reports/thank-you-to-our-donors/):

'$20,000+

  • Deseret Trust Company
  • Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund
  • Self-Reliance Charity
  • The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints-Humanitarian Services North America
  • United Way of Northern Utah
  • United Way of Salt Lake

"David H. Burton, General Authority Emeritus, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints" is listed on the Board of Trustees.[6]

In 2012, the Church helped with the annual Thanksgiving Dinner:

Our board member, Tony Smith, help organize this year’s Thanksgiving meal at Sunrise Metro, he’d like to share that experience with you: “On November 22, 2012, Thanksgiving Dinner was prepared and served by Members of The Road Home board of trustees, Services Committee, and friends of the organization, and the Sunrise Metro Community Council. Because of the collaboration and generosity of so many, it was a huge success! The following individuals all played a HUGE part in ensuring the event was well organized and a good time was had by all. Either through direct donation, or by volunteering to assist in the kitchen and serving food, we could not have done it without everyone involved. Bev Uipi Michelle Monical Daela Taeoalii-Higgs Richard Humpherys (Bishop Storehouse, Church of Jesus Christ of Later-day Saints) Diana Leka Dorothy Rose Brettney Smith Megan (Case Manager @ Sunrise Metro) [7]

In 2013, the Church helped The Road Home purchase their facility:

For years, The Road Home has leased the facility in Midvale. To characterize the facility as a “fixer upper” would be generous.

The building, while structurally sound, is in need of serious improvements. Our team’s wealth of compassion, knowledge, and dedication cannot entirely compensate for a roof riddled with leaks or worn out boilers that barely produce enough hot water to meet demand.

Through thoughtful negotiation on the part of our Board of Trustees, coupled with support from our friends at Zion’s Bank, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and George S. and Dolores Doré Eccles Foundation, The Road Home has purchased the facility in Midvale.[8]

The road home 2016 donors.png

Response to claim: "Utah Food Bank"...The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints is not listed as a member"

The author(s) of "For my Wife and Children" ("Letter to my Wife") make(s) the following claim:

Utah Food Bank “Utah Food Bank is fortunate to have incredibly generous community partners who help fulfill our mission to "Fight Hunger Statewide.” The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints is not listed as a member.

FairMormon Response

Fact checking results: This claim is false

The Utah Food Bank does not provide a list of its donors on its website, so nobody is "listed as a member."


In 2007, the Utah Food Bank teamed up with the Church's Welfare Square Cannery:

When Utah Food Bank Services recently teamed up with the Church’s Welfare Square Cannery, more than 8,600 cans of salsa were produced. All the food and canning supplies were donated by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, but Utah Food Bank Services recruited the necessary volunteers from the Salt Lake County Mayor’s Office to complete this enormous project. [9]


In 2013, the Church donated 250,000 pounds of food to the Utah Food Bank:

The Church’s donation includes canned goods such as fruit, vegetables, and beans. The food will be distributed to families in need at community pantries, soup kitchens, and shelters across the United States. The Utah Food Bank, a member of the Feeding America network, received 250,000 pounds of the food. [10]


The author also totally misses the fact that one of the seats on the Utah Food Bank's Board of Directors belongs to "The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints".

Utah food bank board of directors.png

Response to claim: "What if instead of investing billions of dollars a year into for-profit real estate, the Church built hospitals and homeless shelters, and actually tried to emulate the acts of kindness performed by Jesus for the sick and afflicted?"

The author(s) of "For my Wife and Children" ("Letter to my Wife") make(s) the following claim:

What if instead of investing billions of dollars a year into for-profit real estate, the Church built hospitals and homeless shelters, and actually tried to emulate the acts of kindness performed by Jesus for the sick and afflicted?

FairMormon Response

Fact checking results: This claim contains propaganda - The author, or the author's source, is providing information or ideas in a slanted way in order to instill a particular attitude or response in the reader

The author unfairly accuses the Church of not participating in efforts to provide "hospitals and homeless shelters," while ignoring the data that they actually do just that. Of the five charitable organizations listed by the author, the Church is involved with and sponsors four of them. The fifth one, Rescue Mission of Salt Lake, is sponsored by an alliance of non-LDS Christian churches. The Church directly supports the following:
  • Family Promise
  • Fourth Street Clinic
  • The Road Home
  • Utah Food Bank

This is in addition to the Church's own extensive welfare and humanitarian services program.

Logical Fallacy: False Cause—The author assumes that a real or perceived relationship between two events means that one caused the other.

The author assumes that because the Church has "billions of dollars" worth of "for-profit real estate," that they are not sponsoring local Salt Lake City based homeless shelters and medical clinics. The evidence disproves the author's claim.


Notes

  1. Peter Henderson, "Insight: Mormon church made wealthy by donations," Reuters (12 Aug. 2012)
  2. Kevin Spear, "Mormon church completes huge buy of land – now owns 2 percent of Florida land," Orlando Sentinel (March 6, 2014)
  3. Jeremy Runnells, "Letter to a CES Director", 2013
  4. Lynn G. Robbins, "Tithing—a Commandment Even for the Destitute," Ensign, (April 2005)
  5. Elder Lynn G. Robbins, "Tithing—a Commandment Even for the Destitute," April 2005 General Conference off-site
  6. "Board of Trustees"
  7. "Thanksgiving at Sunrise Metro" (5 December 2012)
  8. "Moving Forward: Spring Newsletter 2013" (8 April 2013)
  9. "Relationships Started From a Can"
  10. "Church Donates 1 Million Pounds of Food to Feeding America," Church News (20 May 2013)