Question: Why does the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormon) not provide public disclosure of its financial data?

Table of Contents

Question: Why does the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormon) not provide public disclosure of its financial data?

The Church complies with all legal requirements for reporting income, business profits, and donations

Some have claimed that the Church ought to provide full disclosure of its financial records to members or interested on-lookers.

Believing members typically believe that their tithes and offerings are consecrated gifts to God, and do not feel that they need a detailed accounting of their use.

That said, the Church complies with all legal requirements for reporting income, business profits, and donations. These laws vary by country and political jurisdiction. But, the Church has no duty to provide more information than that required by law.

Providing "full disclosure" would not provide much more information than is available now without considerable time and expense

"Full disclosure" is a nice slogan or buzz-word, but those who advocate for it do not seem to realize the difficulties with it, or the fact that doing so would not provide much more information than is available now without considerable time and expense. Many critics would also likely be impossible to satisfy on this front, and complaints would then turn to micromanaging and Monday-morning quarterbacking Church expenditures.

Financial experts discuss these and other issues here:

Accusations that the Church does not provide "full disclosure" are often intended to cast questions on the honesty of the Church or its leaders

These accusations are often intended to cast questions on the honesty of the Church or its leaders. Similar strategies are employed in other such complaints, such as:

For a detailed response, see: Mormonism and church integrity/City Creek Center Mall in Salt Lake City }}

Notes