Source:Times and Seasons:1 Jan 1844:We have been informed by a gentleman who has traversed a large portion of the Indian country of Northern Texas...that there are vestiges of ancient cities and ruined castles or temples

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Times and Seasons (1 Jan 1844): "We have been informed by a gentleman who has traversed a large portion of the Indian country of Northern Texas...that there are vestiges of ancient cities and ruined castles or temples"

Every day adds fresh testimony to the already accumulated evidence on the here was very little known about ruined cities and dilapidated buildings. The general presumption was, that no people possessing more intelligence than our present race of Indians had ever inhabited this continent, and the accounts given in the Book of Mormon concerning large cities and civilized people having inhabited this land, was generally disbelieved and pronounced a humbug. Priest, since then has thrown some light on this interesting has thrown in a flood of testimony, and from the following statements it is evident that the Book of Mormon does not give a more extensive account of large and populous cities than those discoveries now demonstrate to be even in existence. ED

(From the Texas Telegraph, Oct. 11.)

We have been informed by a gentleman who has traversed a large portion of the Indian country of Northern Texas, and the country lying between Santa Fe and the Pacific, that there are vestiges of ancient cities and ruined castles or temples on the Rio Puerco and on the Colorado of the west. He says that on one of the branches of the Rio Puerco, a few days travel from Santa Fe, there is an immense pile of ruins that appear to belong to an ancient temple....Neither the Indians residing in the vicinity, nor the oldest Spanish settlers of the nearest settlements, can give any account of the origin of these buildings. They merely know that they have stood there f rom the earliest periods to which their traditions extend. The antiquarian who is desirous to trace the Aztic or Toltec races in their migrations from the northern regions of America, may find in these ancient edifices many subjects of curious speculation.[1]

Notes

  1. "ED" [John Taylor], "ANCIENT RUINS.," (1 Jan 1844) Times and Seasons 5:390-391.