Mountain Meadows Massacre

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Mountain Meadows Massacre

Summary: In September 1857 a group of Mormons in southern Utah killed all adult members of an Arkansas wagon train that was headed for California. Critics charge that the massacre was typical of Mormon "culture of violence," and claim that Church leaders—possibly as high as Brigham Young—approved of, or even ordered the killing.


History of the Mountain Meadows Massacre

Summary: In September 1857 a group of Mormons in southern Utah killed all adult members of an Arkansas wagon train that was headed for California. Critics charge that the massacre was typical of Mormon "culture of violence," and claim that Church leaders—possibly as high as Brigham Young—approved of, or even ordered the killing.

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Brigham Young

Summary: Critics make numerous charges and claims against Brigham Young in relation to the Massacre. Most of these are ill-founded or misrepresented.

Prosecution

Summary: Critics charge that Brigham Young blocked prosecution of those who committed the Mountain Meadows Massacre.

Was prosecution blocked by the Church?

Summary: It is claimed that actions of the institutional Church and/or local Mormons prevented federal officials from prosecuting those guilty of the Mountain Meadows Massacre.

Thomas Kane

Summary: Some who use the Mountain Meadows Massacre to attack the Church often mention non-LDS Col. Thomas Kane. Kane was a good friend to the Mormons prior to Joseph Smith's death, and he was also briefly involved in the Massacre issue. There are two issues raised by critics in conjunction with Kane: 1) some blame Kane for helping Brigham Young to cover up the Massacre, 2) some paint Kane as ridiculous, vain, or foolish—this is apparently done on the theory that anyone who likes or helps the Mormons must either be evil or a dupe.

Other personalities involved in Mountain Meadows

Summary: A variety of charges or claims are made about other observers or participants in the events at Mountain Meadows.