Criticism of Mormonism/Books/Mormonism Unmasked/Chapter 7

Table of Contents

Response to claims made in "Chapter 7: Revealing Revelations"

A FairMormon Analysis of: Mormonism Unmasked, a work by author: R. Philip Roberts

Quick Navigation

∗       ∗       ∗

Response to claim: 95 - The author depicts a dialogue between an evangelical and a Mormon

The author(s) of Mormonism Unmasked make(s) the following claim:

The author depicts a dialogue between an evangelical and a Mormon:

Mary: "The Bible is God's infallible and inerrant Word! Do you believe that?"
Mormon: Of course I do!...See, we believe and use the Bible like you do!"

FairMormon Response

Fact checking results: This claim contains mistakes and/or errors - The author has stated erroneous or incorrect information or misinterpreted their sources

Mormons use the King James Version of the Bible. Mormons do not consider the Bible to be "infallible and inerrant." No Mormon would claim this. When the Mormon says "of course I do," she if referring to the fact that we believe in the Bible.

Response to claim: 97 - "despite repeated claims to the contrary, the LDS Church does not actually believe the Bible is accurate and can be trusted"

The author(s) of Mormonism Unmasked make(s) the following claim:

The author states that "despite repeated claims to the contrary, the LDS Church does not actually believe the Bible is accurate and can be trusted. They regard it, at the very best, as incomplete. At the worst, they think it has been tainted beyond reliability."

FairMormon Response

Fact checking results: This claim is a falsehood - The author has disseminated false information

Nonsense. The Bible is one of the four standard works used by Mormons. Latter-day Saints do not believe that the Bible has been "tainted beyond reliability." Far from it, the Church teaches that the Bible contains the "converting, healing Spirit of Christ."



Gospel Topics (lds.org), "Bible: The Word of God"

Gospel Topics (lds.org)
The Holy Bible literally contains within its pages the converting, healing Spirit of Christ, which has turned men’s hearts for centuries, leading them to pray, to choose right paths, and to search to find their Savior.


The Holy Bible is well named. It is holy because it teaches truth, holy because it warms us with its spirit, holy because it teaches us to know God and understand His dealings with men, and holy because it testifies throughout its pages of the Lord Jesus Christ.

Click here to view the complete article

Response to claim: 98 - the Bible "plays only a small part in the religion of Mormonism anyway"

The author(s) of Mormonism Unmasked make(s) the following claim:

The author claims that the Bible "plays only a small part in the religion of Mormonism anyway" and that "little or no LDS theology is really derived from the Bible."

FairMormon Response

Fact checking results: This claim is a falsehood - The author has disseminated false information

This claim is nonsense.



Response to claim: 103 - "most LDS descriptions of the translation process say Smith utilized the Urim and Thummim...Years later they stated that Smith actually used a small magic rock called a "seer stone"

The author(s) of Mormonism Unmasked make(s) the following claim:

The author states that "most LDS descriptions of the translation process say Smith utilized the Urim and Thummim as the instruments for translation. However, documented testimonies from several of those involved in the process, including Emma Smith and David Whitmer, described the process differently. Years later they stated that Smith actually used a small magic rock called a "seer stone" to comprehend the words on the plates and transcribe them into English."

FairMormon Response

Fact checking results: This claim is based upon correct information - The author is providing knowledge concerning some particular fact, subject, or event





Gospel Topics (lds.org), "Book of Mormon Translation"

Gospel Topics (lds.org), (2013)
These two instruments—the interpreters and the seer stone—were apparently interchangeable and worked in much the same way such that, in the course of time, Joseph Smith and his associates often used the term “Urim and Thummim” to refer to the single stone as well as the interpreters. In ancient times, Israelite priests used the Urim and Thummim to assist in receiving divine communications. Although commentators differ on the nature of the instrument, several ancient sources state that the instrument involved stones that lit up or were divinely illumin[at]ed. Latter-day Saints later understood the term “Urim and Thummim” to refer exclusively to the interpreters. Joseph Smith and others, however, seem to have understood the term more as a descriptive category of instruments for obtaining divine revelations and less as the name of a specific instrument.

Click here to view the complete article

Notes