José Smith/Piedras videntess/"Roca en el sombrero" utilizado para la traducción del Libro de Mormón

Tabla de Contenidos

Joseph Smith usó la misma piedra de "piedra en el sombrero" para traducir que él utilizó para "la excavación del dinero"

Saltar a subtema:


Temas del Evangelio: "Cuando José comprendió su llamamiento profético, se dio cuenta de que podía usar esa piedra para un fin más elevado: traducir Escrituras"

"La traducción del Libro de Mormón," Temas del Evangelio en LDS.org (2013):

Los escribientes de José Smith y él escribieron acerca de dos instrumentos que utilizaron en la traducción del Libro de Mormón. Según los testigos de la traducción, cuando José miraba por los instrumentos, las palabras de las Escrituras aparecían en inglés. Un instrumento, que en el Libro de Mormón se menciona como los “intérpretes”, es más conocido por los Santos de los Últimos Días de la actualidad como el “Urim y Tumim”. ....

El otro instrumento, que José Smith descubrió enterrado en el suelo años antes de recibir las planchas de oro, era una pequeña piedra ovalada o “piedra vidente”18. Cuando era joven, durante la década de 1820, José Smith, al igual que otras personas de la época, utilizó una piedra vidente para buscar objetos perdidos y tesoros enterrados19. Cuando José comprendió su llamamiento profético, se dio cuenta de que podía usar esa piedra para un fin más elevado: traducir Escrituras.[1]

Pregunta: ¿Por qué José Smith usaría la misma piedra de la traducción del Libro de Mormón que él utiliza para el "dinero cavar"

Pregunta: ¿Qué papel desempeñó José en la comunidad cuando era joven?

  NEEDS TRANSLATION  


Joseph acted as a "village seer"

Brant Gardner notes that Joseph filled the role of "village seer," and that the invitation of village seers to assist local treasure diggers was actually an English tradition. According to Keith Thomas,

There was not necessarily anything magical about the search for treasure as such, but in practice the assistance of a conjurer or wizard was very frequently invoked. This was partly because it was thought that special divining tools might help, such as the 'Mosaical Rods' for which many contemporary formulae survive.[2]

Gardner continues by confirming that "[w]hat the modern world tends to know about the village seers is the result of only one of the ways in which their talents were put to use. Since they could see that which was hidden, local seers became involved in the mania of digging for lost treasure."[3] Add to this the statements regarding Joseph's money digging activities mentioned in the Hurlbut affidavits, and it is easy to see why critics wish to make an issue regarding Joseph's utilization of the his "treasure seeking" seer stone to assist in the translation of the Book of Mormon.


Pregunta: ¿La aparición de José en 1826 ante un juez en Bainbridge no probó que él había estado usando su piedra vidente para propósitos nefastos?

  NEEDS TRANSLATION  


The actual evidence indicates a favorable outcome for Joseph Smith

Even Joseph himself noted that he was sought out by Josiah Stowell ("Stoal") to use the stone to find hidden valuables. (JS-H 1:55-56) Stowell "came for Joseph on account of having heard that he possessed certain keys by which he could discern things invisible to the natural eye."[4]

Stowell eventually joined the Church; some of his family and community religious leaders[5], however, brought charges against Joseph in court for events related to this treasure seeking effort. This led to what is commonly referred to as Joseph's 1826 Bainbridge "glasslooking trial." Although this proceeding was used to accuse Joseph of being a "disorderly person" and attempting to defraud Stowell, it should be noted that Stowell actually testified in Joseph's defense. The report of the result of this proceeding varies depending upon who is telling the story. Some say that Joseph was found "guilty," or "condemned." Others indicate that he was "discharged." Constable De Zeng indicated that the proceeding was "not a trial." A synthesis of all the evidence indicates a favorable outcome for Joseph Smith.[6]

Gardner concludes that "[t]he implication is that since Joseph used a peep stone, he must be seen in the same category as those who ran a scam with one. Clearly the 1826 court appearance tells us that some contemporaries considered him in that category....However, the fact that the communities would be willing to follow the confidence scheme simply tells us that there was an existing belief system in which seer stones were considered effective and acceptable."[7] More recent critics, notably Dan Vogel, have suggested that Joseph belongs in the category of a pious fraud,[8] a model that others have found incoherent and inadequate[9] to explain Joseph's successes and failures as a village seer (and later prophet) and his tendency to polarize acquaintances into believers or debunkers.


Pregunta: ¿Por qué José Smith no seguiría usando los intérpretes sagrados provistos con el registro nefita?

  NEEDS TRANSLATION  


Ultimately, it was more convenient for him to use the seer stone

Joseph used his white seer stone sometimes "for convenience" during the translation of the 116 pages with Martin Harris; later witnesses reported him using his brown seer stone.[10]

The Nephite interpreters which were given to Joseph along with the plates consisted of two stones set in a bow, resembling a pair of "large spectacles." Martin Harris described the Nephite interpreters as being "about two inches in diameter, perfectly round, and about five-eighths of an inch thick at the centre.... They were joined by a round bar of diver, about three-eights of an inch in diameter, and about four inches long, which with the two stones, would make eight inches."[11]

The Nephite interpreters, therefore, were yet another set of seer stones. It is unsurprising that Joseph would be completely comfortable with these instruments, given his experience with the use of seer stones up to that time.

Latter-day Saints associate the term "Urim and Thummim" with these interpreters. Gardner notes,

We all know that Joseph used the Urim and Thummim to translate the Book of Mormon—except he didn't. The Book of Mormon mentions interpreters, but not the Urim and Thummim. It was the Book of Mormon interpreters which were given to Joseph with the plates. When Moroni took back the interpreters after the loss of the 116 manuscript pages, Joseph completed the translation with one of his seer stones. Until after the translation of the Book of Mormon, the Urim and Thummim belonged to the Bible and the Bible only. [51] The Urim and Thummim became part of the story when it was presented within and to the Great Tradition. Eventually, even Joseph Smith used Urim and Thummim indiscriminately as labels generically representing either the Book of Mormon interpreters or the seer stone used during translation. [52] [12]

After the loss of the 116 pages, contemporary accounts are very clear that Joseph continued the translation using his seer stone. In later years, the term "Urim and Thummim" was retroactively applied to both the Nephite interpreters and to Joseph's seer stone. Thus the use of "Urim and Thummim" tends to obscure the fact that two different instruments were employed.


Pregunta: ¿José Smith usó su piedra vidente para ver la ubicación de las planchas de oro en el cerro Cumorah?

  NEEDS TRANSLATION  


There is an account which indicates that this may have happened

Joseph's seer stone may even have played a role in the location of the plates and the Nephite interpreters themselves. There is considerable evidence that the location of the plates and Nephite interpreters were revealed to Joseph via his second, white seer stone. In 1859, Martin Harris recalled that "Joseph had a stone which was dug from the well of Mason Chase...It was by means of this stone he first discovered the plates."[13]

Some critics have sought to create a contradiction here, since Joseph's history reported that Moroni revealed the plates to him (JS-H 1:34-35,42). This is an example of a false dichotomy: Moroni could easily have told Joseph about the plates and interpreters. The vision to Joseph may well have then come through the seer stone, as some of the sections of the Doctrine and Covenants (e.g., Section X) would later be revealed. One account from Henry Harris in Eber D. Howe's anti-Mormon book Mormonism Unvailed matches this theory well:

I had a conversation with [Joseph], and asked him where he found them [the plates] and how he come to know where they were. he said he had a revelation from God that told him they were hid in a certain hill and he looked in his [seer] stone and saw them in the place of deposit.[14]


Pregunta: ¿José Smith utiliza su propia piedra vidente para traducir el Libro de Mormón?

Muchos testimonios confirman que José empleó su piedra vidente durante parte del proceso de traducción

José Smith traduce utilizando la piedra vidente colocado dentro de su sombrero mientras que Martin Harris actúa como escribano. Los derechos de autor de la imagen (c) 2014 Anthony Sweat. Esta imagen aparece en la publicación de la Iglesia From Darkness Unto Light: Joseph Smith's Translation and Publication of the Book of Mormon, by Michael Hubbard Mackay and Gerrit J. Dirkmaat, Religious Studies Center, BYU, Deseret Book Company (May 11, 2015)

Muchos relatos de testigos oculares confirman que José empleó su piedra vidente durante la parte del proceso de traducción. Martin Harris afirma que José usó los intérpretes nefitas y más tarde pasó a utilizar la piedra vidente "por conveniencia". [15] De hecho, el élder Nelson se refiere a la utilización de la piedra vidente en su charla 1993:

Los detalles de este método milagroso de traducción aún no se conocen completamente. Sin embargo, sí tenemos algunas ideas valiosas. David Whitmer escribió:

"José Smith pondría a la piedra vidente en un sombrero, y puso su cara en el sombrero, dibujo de cerca alrededor de su cara para excluir la luz y en la oscuridad de la luz espiritual brillaría. Parece un trozo de algo parecido a pergamino, y en esa apareció la escritura. Parecería un carácter a la vez, y en virtud de que era la interpretación en Inglés. Hermano José leía el Inglés a Oliver Cowdery, quien era su escriba principal, y cuando fue escrito y repetido al Hermano José para ver si era correcto, entonces desaparecería, y aparecería otro personaje con la interpretación. . Así, el Libro de Mormón fue traducido por el don y el poder de Dios, y no por ningún poder del hombre " (David Whitmer, An Address to All Believers in Christ, Richmond, Mo.: n.p., 1887, p. 12.) [16]

También parece que la piedra vidente se refiere a veces como el "Urim y Tumim", lo que indica que el nombre podría ser asignado a cualquier dispositivo que se utilizó para el propósito de la traducción. [17]


Pregunta: ¿José Smith usar los intérpretes nefitas a traducir? O usó su propia piedra vidente?

José Smith usó tanto la piedra vidente y los intérpretes nefitas, y ambos fueron llamados "Urim y Tumim"

José Smith utiliza tanto los intérpretes nefitas y su piedra vidente durante el proceso de traducción, sin embargo, sólo se oye la "Urim y Tumim" que se utiliza para este propósito.

  1. Describió el instrumento como 'espectáculos' y se refirió a ella utilizando un término Antiguo Testamento, Urim y Tumim.
  2. También a veces se aplica el término a otras piedras que poseía, llamadas 'piedras videntes' porque le ayudaron en la recepción de revelaciones como vidente. El Profeta recibió algunas revelaciones tempranas a través del uso de estas piedras videntes.
  3. Los registros indican que poco después de la fundación de la Iglesia en 1830, el Profeta dejó de usar las piedras videntes como un medio regulares de recibir revelaciones. En cambio, él dictó las revelaciones después de preguntar al Señor sin el empleo de un instrumento externo.

Emma Smith confirmó que José cambiar entre los intérpretes nefitas y su piedra vidente durante la traducción

Emma Smith Bidamon describe el uso de José de varias piedras durante la traducción a Emma peregrino el 27 de marzo 1870 (ortografía original retenida):

Ahora, la primera que mi <marido> tradujo, [el libro] fue traducido por el uso del Urim y Tumim, y que era la parte que Martin Harris perdió, después de que usó una piedra pequeña, no exactamente, negro, pero era en lugar de un color oscuro ".[18]


Pregunta: ¿José Fielding Smith dijera: Que no era razonable para Joseph Smith usar la piedra vidente para traducir el Libro de Mormón?

Joseph Fielding Smith dijo: "No parece razonable suponer Que el Profeta 'sustituto de algo claramente menor en estas circunstancias'"

Joseph Fielding Smith dijo lo siguiente:

Mientras que la declaración ha sido hecha por algunos autores que el profeta Joseph Smith usó para seer piedra parte del tiempo en su traducción del registro, y puntos de información a colegas que tenía en su poder una piedra, sin embargo, no está en auténtica declaración en la historia de la Iglesia, que establece Que el uso de una piedra del mismo tipo en la traducción que. La información es de oídas, y personalmente, no creo que esta piedra fue utilizada para este propósito. La razón de esta conclusión dan I se encuentra en el estado de Señor al hermano de Jared registrado en el Éter 3: 22-24. Estas piedras, el Urim y Tumim que se dieron al hermano de Jared se conservaron para este fin de traducir el registro, tanto de los Nefitas y los Jareditas. Por otra parte el Profeta estaba impresionado por Moroni con colegas Estas piedras dieron para ese mismo propósito. No parece razonable suponer Que el Profeta sustituiría algo claramente menor en estas circunstancias. Es posible que haya estado son, pero es tan fácil es la historia de este tipo que se hace circular debido a colegas Profeta poseía la piedra del vidente, h que pueden haber utilizado para algunos otros fines. [19]

Un sitio web crítico hace la afirmación: "Así que al parecer incluso el décimo presidente de la Iglesia piensa Que el uso de una piedra para traducir el Libro de Mormón sin 'apenas parece razonable'"[20] Esto es incorrecto.

Joseph Fielding Smith hizo no Que decir que no era razonable utilizar la piedra para traducir el Libro de Mormón. Después de todo, los intérpretes nefitas se vieron compuesto por dos piedras de vidente. Joseph Fielding Smith tenía el problema con eso. Lo que Joseph Fielding Smith pensó que no era razonable era Que Joseph Smith usaría su propia piedra "inferior" vidente en lugar de los intérpretes nefitas.

José Smith Considerado los intérpretes nefitas una versión más potente de su propia piedra vidente

Cuando José obtuvo por primera vez los intérpretes nefitas, los consideraba la versión más potente de la piedra que ya poseía. José Knight Recordó Que José parecía ser más excitado sobre la recepción de los vasos de las placas de oro sí mismos.[21] Después de José volvió de la recuperación de las placas, Joseph Knight retirados del mercado,

Después del desayuno José me llamó a la otra habitación y que en septiembre el pie sobre la cama y apoyó la cabeza en su mano y dice: "Bueno, estoy decepcionado." "Bueno," decir, "Lo siento." " así, "dice," estoy muy decepcionados. Es diez veces mejor de lo que esperaba. "Luego se pasó a contar la longitud y la anchura y el espesor de las placas, y, dijo, que parecen ser de oro. Pero él parecía pensar más de las gafas o el Urim y Tumim de lo que hizo de las placas es, dice, "puedo ver nada. Son maravillosos. Ahora están escritos en caracteres y los quiero traducidos ".[22]

En un principio, José creyó Que la piedra en sí poseía alguna cualidad especial

La creencia de José Que la piedra o los intérpretes nefitas poseía cierta calidad Que los hizo especiales era evidente:

La idea de que fueron los intérpretes nefitas la versión más potente de piedra vidente de José es interesante, ya que implica que había algo especial acerca de las piedras mismas. Es más probable, sin embargo, que era el propietario de Que la percepción de José estaban las piedras más altas debido Estas piedras habían sido consagrado por Dios con el propósito de ver las cosas.

Joseph Fielding Smith no creía José José Eso sería sustituir un vidente para los intérpretes nefitas piedra inferior , que a su vez piedras fueron

Sin embargo, la idea Que los intérpretes nefitas fueron superiores a una "piedra vidente" común fue aceptada por apóstol y Iglesia historiador del siglo XX Joseph Fielding Smith. Eso explica en respuesta a José indicó que pudo haber usado su propia piedra vidente Durante la traducción del Libro de Mormón, Elder Smith que afirma rotundamente que no cree que esto es cierto, ya que la piedra fue menor a los intérpretes nefitas.[21] </blockquote>

Joseph Fielding Smith tenia el derecho a su opinión, y él claramente que era manifestó su opinión. Se basa esto en la escritura del Libro de Éter que indicaba Que los intérpretes se había conservado con el propósito de la traducción. Esta es sin duda una conclusión razonable. Sin embargo, las declaraciones hechas por los contemporáneos de José Smith indican claramente Que la piedra vidente era utilizado en la traducción, y Que por 1833, el título de "Urim y Tumim" se aplicó más tarde a la piedra del vidente, además de los intérpretes nefitas.


Pregunta: ¿Por qué la "piedra blanca" que debemos recibir al entrar en el reino celestial no se discute extensamente en la Escuela Dominical?

  NEEDS TRANSLATION  


The "white stone" mentioned in D&C 130 ties into LDS temple practice and involves things which are held private and sacred

One critic of the Church asks regarding the "white stone" mentioned in D&C 130:

If seer stones, whether in the form of the Urim and Thummim or a peepstone, are so important that perfect, celestial beings would receive one, why did Joseph say they were only for beginners?[23]

The "white stone" mentioned here involves things which are held private and sacred: it ties into LDS temple practice, which FairMormon and other believing members will not discuss in a public forum. So, part of the reason this is not discussed in more detail is because it involves temple doctrines. Those who attend the temple can reflect upon these passages and realize that they play a large role in LDS temple worship.

  • Joseph seemed to regard his own seer stone as a "stepping-stone" to greater knowledge and revelatory experience. This is exactly what D&C 130 says the "white stone" given to the exalted will do: "things pertaining to a higher order of kingdoms will be made known."
  • LDS doctrine teaches that we will continue to learn and progress after this life, until we receive "all that the Father hath." A urim and thummim will, according to Joseph, play a role in that process. But, one would also expect that it too will become unnecessary when we, like Joseph, master the spiritual discipline and principles which the urim and thummim aids in developing.

Orson Pratt, who watched the New Testament revision (JST) and wondered why the use of seer stones/interpreters (as with the Book of Mormon) was not continued reported:

While this thought passed through the speaker's mind, Joseph, as if he read his thoughts, looked up and explained that the Lord gave him the Urim and Thummim when he was inexperienced in the Spirit of inspiration. But now he had advanced so far that he understood the operations of that Spirit and did not need the assistance of that instrument. [24]


Temas del Evangelio en LDS.org, "La traducción del Libro de Mormón"

Temas del Evangelio en LDS.org, (2013)
José Smith y sus escribas escribían de dos instrumentos utilizados en la traducción del Libro de Mormón. Según testigos de la traducción, cuando José miró a los instrumentos, las palabras de la Escritura aparecieron en Inglés. Un instrumento, llamado en el Libro de Mormón los "intérpretes", es mejor conocido por los Santos de los Últimos Días hoy como el "Urim y Tumim." ....


El otro instrumento, que José Smith descubrió en los años en tierra antes de que él recuperó las planchas de oro, era una pequeña piedra oval, o "piedra vidente." Cuando era joven, durante la década de 1820, Joseph Smith, al igual que otros en su día, se utiliza un piedra vidente para buscar objetos perdidos y tesoros enterrados. Cuando José llegó a entender su vocación profética, se enteró de que él podría utilizar esta piedra para el propósito superior de la traducción de las Escrituras.

Haga clic aquí para ver el artículo completo en Inglés

Ensign, "Un testamento atesorado"

Russell M. Nelson,  Ensign, (julio 1993)
Los detalles de este método milagroso de traducción aún no se conocen completamente. Sin embargo, sí tenemos algunas ideas valiosas. David Whitmer escribió:


"José Smith pondría a la piedra vidente en un sombrero, y puso su cara en el sombrero, dibujo de cerca alrededor de su cara para excluir la luz y en la oscuridad de la luz espiritual brillaría. Parece un trozo de algo parecido a pergamino, y en esa apareció la escritura. Parecería un carácter a la vez, y en virtud de que era la interpretación en Inglés. Hermano José leía el Inglés a Oliver Cowdery, quien era su escriba principal, y cuando fue escrito y repetido al Hermano José para ver si era correcto, entonces desaparecería, y aparecería otro personaje con la interpretación. Así, el Libro de Mormón fue traducido por el don y el poder de Dios, y no por ningún poder del hombre. " (David Whitmer, An Address to All Believers in Christ, Richmond, Mo.: n.p., 1887, p. 12.)

Haga clic aquí para ver el artículo completo en Inglés


La conclusión de que José utilizó una piedra o "mágico" "oculto" para ayudar en la traducción del Libro de Mormón es totalmente dependiente de la propia idea preconcebida de que el uso de un instrumento de este tipo no ser aceptable por Dios. Los creyentes, por otra parte, no debería tener problema con una distinción entre un conjunto de piedras videntes frente a otra. Como señala Brant Gardner:.? "Independientemente de la perspectiva desde la que contamos la historia, el hecho esencial de la traducción no se ha modificado ¿Cómo fue el Libro de Mormón se traduce como Joseph insistió continuamente, la única respuesta real, desde cualquier punto de vista, es que que fue traducido por el don y el poder de Dios ". [1]

Actas de la Conferencia FAIR 2009, "José el Vidente-o por qué él Traducir con una roca en su sombrero?"

Brant A. Gardner,  Actas de la Conferencia FAIR 2009, (2009)
Dos imágenes:

La forma de la traducción era tan maravilloso como el descubrimiento. Al poner el dedo sobre uno de los personajes e implorando la ayuda divina, a continuación, mirando a través del Urim y Tumim, que vería la importación por escrito en la llanura Inglés en una pantalla colocada delante de él. Después de entregar esto a su emanuensi, [sic] que de nuevo se procedería de la misma manera y obtener el significado del siguiente carácter, y así sucesivamente, hasta que llegó a la parte de las placas que se sellaron para arriba.

Truman Coe, Presbyterian Minister living among the Saints in Kirtland, 1836

Yo alegremente certifico que yo estaba familiarizado con la manera de José Smith de la traducción del libro de Mormón. Tradujo la mayor parte de ella en la casa de mi Padre. Y a menudo me senté cerca y vi y oí a traducir y escribir durante horas juntos. José nunca tenía una cortina dibujada entre él y su escriba, mientras estaba traduciendo. Ponía el director en su sombrero, y luego colocar su [cara en su] ue, de modo que excluya la luz, y luego [leer] para su escriba las palabras como aparecieron ante él.

Elizabeth Ann Whitmer Cowdery, La esposa de Oliver Cowdery, 1870

Estas dos descripciones de Joseph Smith traduciendo las planchas de oro pintan radicalmente diferentes imágenes del mismo evento. Es fácil aceptar la traducción en las placas de dedo-a-, pero se siente completamente ajeno la roca-en-el-sombrero. Sin embargo, es una descripción mucho mejor atestiguado del proceso que el primero.

¿Por qué tenemos estas dos imágenes si la segunda mejor se ajusta a la mayoría de las descripciones? Para responder a esa pregunta, hay dos historias que deben ser contadas: primero, ¿por qué iba alguien a pensar en la traducción con una piedra en un sombrero de segunda razón por la que son tan sorprendido de que-y?

Haga clic aquí para ver el artículo completo en Inglés


Pregunta: ¿Qué papel Joseph llenar en la comunidad de
Respuesta: Él actuó como un "vidente del pueblo."

Brant Gardner señala que José llenó el papel de la "vidente del pueblo", y que la invitación de los videntes de la aldea para ayudar a los buscadores de tesoros locales era en realidad una tradición Inglés. Según Keith Thomas,

No era necesariamente algo mágico en la búsqueda de un tesoro en sí, pero en la práctica se ha invocado con mucha frecuencia la ayuda de un mago o bruja. Esto fue en parte porque se pensaba que las herramientas especiales adivinatorias pueden ayudar, como el 'Mosaica Rods' para el que muchas fórmulas contemporáneas sobrevivir. [2]

Añádase a esto las declaraciones relacionadas con el dinero de Joseph excavación de las actividades mencionadas en el declaraciones juradas Hurlbut, y es fácil ver por qué los críticos quieren hacer una cuestión relativa a la utilización de José de la su "tesoro buscando" piedra vidente para ayudar en la traducción del Libro de Mormón.

José como glasslooker: el 1826 Bainbridge "juicio"

Incluso el propio Joseph señaló que él fue buscado por Josiah Stowell ("Stoal") para usar la piedra para encontrar objetos de valor ocultos.(JS-H 1:55-56) Stowell "vino por Joseph a causa de haber oído que poseía ciertas claves por la cual podía discernir las cosas invisibles para el ojo natural."[3]

Stowell eventualmente se unió a la Iglesia, algunos de sus familiares y comunitarias líderes religiosos keller1, sin embargo, los cargos contra José en la corte de los eventos relacionados con este esfuerzo que busca el tesoro traído. Esto dio lugar a lo que comúnmente se conoce como el de Joseph 1826 Bainbridge "glasslooking juicio." Aunque este procedimiento se utiliza para acusar a José de ser una "persona desordenada" y el intento de defraudar a Stowell, hay que señalar que en realidad Stowell testificó en defensa de José. El informe del resultado de este procedimiento varía dependiendo de quién está contando la historia. Hay quien dice que José fue encontrado "culpable" o "condenado". Otros indican que estaba "dado de alta." Constable De Zeng indicó que el procedimiento no era "un juicio". Una síntesis de toda la evidencia indica un resultado favorable para Joseph Smith.[4]

Gardner concluye que "[e] l implicación es que desde que José usó una piedra pío, debe ser visto en la misma categoría que los que corrían una estafa con una. Está claro que el aspecto de la corte 1826 nos dice que algunos contemporáneos lo consideraban en esa categoría .... Sin embargo, el hecho de que las comunidades estarían dispuestos a seguir el esquema de confianza, simplemente nos dice que había un sistema de creencias existentes en los que se consideran eficaces y aceptables piedras videntes ". gardner4 críticos más recientes, sobre todo Dan Vogel, han sugerido que José pertenece a la categoría de un fraude piadoso, un modelo que otros han encontrado incoherente e insuficiente para explicar los éxitos y fracasos de José como un vidente del pueblo (y más tarde profeta) y su tendencia a polarizar a los conocidos en creyentes o detractores. [5][6]

Pregunta: ¿Por qué continuar la traducción del Libro de Mormón usando la piedra en lugar de los intérpretes nefitas
Respuesta: Debido a que era más conveniente.

Joseph utilizó su blanca piedra vidente veces "por conveniencia", durante la traducción de las 116 páginas con Martin Harris; testigos posteriores lo informaron el uso de su piedra marrón vidente.[7]

Los intérpretes nefitas que fueron dados a José junto a las placas consistían en dos piedras en un arco, se asemeja a un par de "grandes espectáculos". Martin Harris describió los intérpretes nefitas como "cerca de dos pulgadas de diámetro, perfectamente redondo, y alrededor de cinco octavos de pulgada de espesor en el centro .... Ellos fueron acompañados por una barra redonda de buzo, alrededor de tres octavos de pulgadas de diámetro y de unos diez centímetros de largo, que con las dos piedras, haría ocho pulgadas. "[8]

Los intérpretes nefitas, por lo tanto, eran otro conjunto de piedras videntes. No es de extrañar que José sería completamente cómodo con estos instrumentos, dada su experiencia con el uso de piedras videntes hasta ese momento.

Santos de los Últimos Días asocian el término "Urim y Tumim" con estos intérpretes. Gardner señala:

Todos sabemos que José usó el Urim y Tumim para traducir el Libro de Mormón—excepto que él no lo hizo. El Libro de Mormón menciona intérpretes, pero no el Urim y Tumim. Era el Libro de Mormón intérpretes que fueron dados a José con las placas. Cuando Moroni llevó de vuelta a los intérpretes después de la pérdida de las 116 páginas manuscritas, Joseph terminó la traducción con una de sus piedras videntes. Hasta después de la traducción del Libro de Mormón, el Urim y Tumim pertenecían a la Biblia y sólo la Biblia. [51] El Urim y Tumim se convirtieron en parte de la historia en que fue presentada dentro de y para la Gran Tradición. Con el tiempo, incluso José Smith utilizó Urim y Tumim indiscriminadamente como etiquetas genéricamente que representan ya sea el Libro de Mormón intérpretes o la piedra vidente utilizado durante la traducción. [52] [9]

Tras la pérdida de las 116 páginas, relatos de la época tienen muy claro que José continuó la traducción usando su piedra vidente. En años posteriores, el término "Urim y Tumim" se aplicó retroactivamente tanto a los intérpretes nefitas y a la piedra vidente de José. Así, el uso de "Urim y Tumim" tiende a oscurecer el hecho de que se utilizaron dos instrumentos diferentes.

Pregunta: ¿Cambió José Smith usa su piedra vidente para ver la ubicación de las planchas de oro
Respuesta: Es posible. Hay un relato que indica que esto puede haber sucedido.

Piedra vidente de José, incluso puede haber jugado un papel en la localización de las placas y de los propios intérpretes nefitas. Existe considerable evidencia de que la localización de las placas e intérpretes nefitas se reveló a José a través de su segundo, piedra vidente blanco. En 1859, Martin Harris recordó que "José tenía una piedra que fue sacada del pozo de Mason Chase ... Fue a través de esta piedra se descubrió por primera vez las placas."[10]

Algunos críticos han tratado de crear una contradicción, ya que la historia de José, informó que Moroni reveló que las placas se le(JS-H 1:34-35,42). Este es un ejemplo de una falsa dicotomía: Moroni fácilmente pudo haber dicho a José acerca de las placas e intérpretes. La visión de José, así puede tener entonces ven a través de la piedra del vidente, ya que algunas de las secciones de Doctrina y Convenios (por ejemplo, la sección X) que más tarde se reveló. Un relato de Henry Harris en el libro anti-mormón de Eber D. Howe mormonismo Unvailed coincide con esta teoría, así:

Tuve una conversación con [José], y le pregunté donde las encontró las planchas [] y cómo se llega a saber dónde estaban. me dijo que tenía una revelación de Dios que le decía que se escondieron en una determinada colina y miró en su piedra [adivino] y ellos vieron en el lugar de depósito. [11]

Notas

  1. "La traducción del Libro de Mormón," Temas del Evangelio en LDS.org (2013)
  2. Keith Thomas, Religion and the Decline of Magic, 234 quoted by Gardner in Joseph the Seer...
  3. Brant A. Gardner, Joseph the Seer—or Why Did He Translate With a Rock in His Hat?, 2009 FAIR Conference presentation.
  4. Lucy Mack Smith, Biographical Sketches of Joseph Smith the Prophet, and His Progenitors for Many Generations (Liverpool, S.W. Richards, 1853),91–92.
  5. David Keller, The Bainbridge Conspiracy, Fair Blog, March 23, 2008
  6. David Keller, Not Guilty, Fair Blog, Dec. 17, 2008.
  7. Gardner, Joseph the Seer
  8. Trevor Luke, "The Scandal in the Practice: Joseph Smith as a Religious Performer" 2009 Sunstone Conference
  9. David Keller, Seer or Pious Fraud, Fair Blog, May 5, 2008
  10. See Mark Ashurst-McGee, "A Pathway to Prophethood: Joseph Smith Junior as Rodsman, Village Seer, and Judeo-Christian Prophet," (Master's Thesis, University of Utah, Logan, Utah, 2000), 320–326. Buy online
  11. Joel Tiffany, "Mormonism—No. II," Tiffany's Monthly (June 1859): 165–166; cited in Richard Van Wagoner and Steve Walker, "Joseph Smith: 'The Gift of Seeing'", Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought vol. 15, no. 2 (Summer 1982):62, footnote 27.
  12. J. V. Coombs, Religious Delusions: Studies of the False Faiths of To-Day as cited in Gardner, Joseph the Seer. Van Wagoner and Walker note that "These stones could not have been the Nephite interpreters, yet Joseph specifically calls them 'Urim and Thummim.' The most obvious explanation for such wording is that he used the term generically to include any device with the potential for 'communicating light perfectly, and intelligence perfectly, through a principle that God has ordained for that purpose,' as John Taylor would later put it." as cited in Gardner, Joseph the Seer.
  13. Mormonism—II," Tiffany's Monthly (June 1859): 163, see also 169; cited in Ashurst-McGee (2000), 286.
  14. Henry Harris, statement in E.D. Howe Mormonism Unvailed (1833), 252; cited in Ashurst-McGee (2000), 290.
  15. Brigham H. Roberts, Comprehensive History of the Church (Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University Press, 1965), 1:128–129. GospeLink "[Martin Harris] dijo que el Profeta poseía una piedra vidente, en la cual fue habilitado para traducir, así como con el Urim y Tumim, y por conveniencia se utiliza a veces la piedra vidente."
  16. Russell M. Nelson, "A Treasured Testament," Ensign (July 1993), 61. off-site (Inglés)
  17. Stephen D. Ricks, The Translation and Publication of the Book of Mormon, Featured Papers, Maxwell Institute, Provo UT. off-site (Inglés)
  18. "Emma Smith Bidamon to Emma Pilgrim, 27 marzo 1870," Early Mormon Documents, 1:532.
  19. Joseph Fielding Smith, Doctrines of Salvation, 3:225–26.
  20. "Translation of the Book of Mormon," MormonThink.com.
  21. 21,0 21,1 Roger Nicholson, "The Spectacles, the Stone, the Hat and the Book: A Twenty-first Century Believer's View of the Book of Mormon Translation," Interpreter: A Journal of Mormon Scripture 5 (2013) 121-190.
  22. “Joseph Knight Sr., Reminiscence, Circa 1835-1847,” in Early Mormon Documents, 4:15. Spelling has been modernized and formatted for readability. Original spelling and formatting is as follows: “After Brackfist Joseph Cald me in to the other Room and he set his foot on the Bed and leaned his head on his hand and says well I am Dissop[o]inted. well, say I[,] I am sorrey[.] Well, says he[,] I am grateley Dissop[o]inted, it is ten times Better then I expected. Then he went on to tell the length and width and thickness of the plates[,] and[,] said he[,] they appear to be Gold But he seamed to think more of the glasses or the urim and thummem then [than] he Did of the Plates for[,] says he[,] I can see any thing[.] They are Marvelus[.] Now they are written in Caracters and I want them translated[.]" Cited in Note 40 of Nicholson, "The Spectacles, the Stone".
  23. "Translation of the Book of Mormon," MormonThink.com.
  24. Richard L. Anderson, "The Mature Joseph Smith and Treasure Searching," Brigham Young University Studies 24 no. 4 (1984). PDF link
    Precaución: Este artículo fue publicado antes de que Mark Hoffman 's se descubrieron falsificaciones. Se puede tratar documentos fraudulentos como genuinos. Haga clic para la lista de documentos falsificados conocidos.
    Discusses money-digging; Salem treasure hunting episode; fraudulent 1838 Missouri treasure hunting revelation; Wood Scrape; “gift of Aaron”; “wand or rod”; Heber C. Kimball rod and prayer; magic; occult; divining lost objects; seerstone; parchments; talisman ; citing Orson Pratt, "Discourse at Brigham City," 27 June 1874, Ogden (Utah) Junction, cited in Orson Pratt, "Two Days´ Meeting at Brigham City," Millennial Star 36 (11 August 1874), 498–499.
  1. [back] Russell M. Nelson, "A Treasured Testament," Ensign (July 1993), 61. off-site (Inglés)
  2. [back] Brant A. Gardner, Why Did He Translate With a Rock in His Hat?, 2009 FAIR Conference presentation.
  3. [back] Keith Thomas, Religion and the Decline of Magic, 234 quoted by Gardner in Joseph the Seer...
  4. [back] Brant A. Gardner, Joseph the Seer—or Why Did He Translate With a Rock in His Hat?, 2009 FAIR Conference presentation.
  5. [back]  Lucy Mack Smith, Biographical Sketches of Joseph Smith the Prophet, and His Progenitors for Many Generations (Liverpool, S.W. Richards, 1853),91–92.
  6. [back] David Keller, The Bainbridge Conspiracy, Fair Blog, March 23, 2008
  7. [back] David Keller, Not Guilty, Fair Blog, Dec. 17, 2008
  8. [back] Gardner, Joseph the Seer
  9. [back] David Keller, Seer or Pious Fraud, Fair Blog, May 5, 2008
  10. [back] Trevor Luke, "The Scandal in the Practice: Joseph Smith as a Religious Performer" 2009 Sunstone Conference
  11. [back]  See Mark Ashurst-McGee, "A Pathway to Prophethood: Joseph Smith Junior as Rodsman, Village Seer, and Judeo-Christian Prophet," (Master's Thesis, University of Utah, Logan, Utah, 2000), 320–326. Buy online
  12. [back]  Joel Tiffany, "Mormonism—No. II," Tiffany's Monthly (June 1859): 165–166; cited in VanWagoner and Walker, footnote 27.
  13. [back] J. V. Coombs, Religious Delusions: Studies of the False Faiths of To-Day as cited in Gardner, Joseph the Seer. Richard Van Wagoner and Steve Walker, "Joseph Smith: 'The Gift of Seeing'", Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought vol. 15, no. 2 (Summer 1982):62, who note that "These stones could not have been the Nephite interpreters, yet Joseph specifically calls them 'Urim and Thummim.' The most obvious explanation for such wording is that he used the term generically to include any device with the potential for 'communicating light perfectly, and intelligence perfectly, through a principle that God has ordained for that purpose,' as John Taylor would later put it." as cited in Gardner, Joseph the Seer.
  14. [back]  Mormonism—II," Tiffany's Monthly (June 1859): 163, see also 169; cited in Ashurst-McGee (2000), 286.
  15. [back]  Henry Harris, statement in E.D. Howe Mormonism Unvailed (1833), 252; cited in Ashurst-McGee (2000), 290.